William Worrilow
     Although spellings of Warrilow vary considerably, the Wa's and Wo's being found in the same family in some cases, this probably reflects the spelling interpretations of the particular scribe at times when the majority of people were illiterate. In later cases however spellings do become more consistent. All are considered to have the same origin as these variations are all found in the earliest records. 

     A closer look at Staffordshire confines the area even more. There are approximately 900 Warrilows listed in the county as a whole, but of these only about 100 are found in the southern half, south of Stafford. Many of these southerners, consistently spelling their names with 'Wo' and having first appeared in Bloxwich (Walsall) in 17th Century, are later concentrated in Walsall. It is possible that this spelling variation reflects the distinctly different vowel pronunciations between the north and south of the county (e.g., southern 'mon' for 'man', 'con' for 'can', 'loff' for 'laff' or laugh).

     The earliest reference to a name which might possibly be related to 'Warrilow' is 'Henry de Warelwich' found in a document of 1176, this is not considered to be particularly strong evidence, but it is never seen again so that it could have changed. In 1253 however, in Inquisition to ascertain the value of land in the Totmonslow Hundred, the name 'de Warilawe' first appears. From this date until 1390 the names of at least twelve different individuals are recorded, and although spelling varies slightly, the fundamental structure and sound of the name are quite clear. At this time all are preceded with 'de' indicating a connection with a specific location.

      From 1390 until the last record seen of 1666, many more individuals are named but without the 'de'. Again spellings vary but all begin with 'War' or 'Wor', all have three syllables, the central one containing the vowel sound provided by 'a, e, i , o, or y', and ending in 'loe, low, law', with or without a final 'e', and in one case 'la'.

     Although spellings of Warrilow vary considerably, the Wa's and Wo's being found in the same family in some cases, this probably reflects the spelling interpretations of the particular scribe at times when the majority of people were illiterate. In later cases however spellings do become more consistent. All are considered to have the same origin as these variations are all found in the earliest records.

     A closer look at Staffordshire confines the area even more. There are approximately 900 Warrilows listed in the county as a whole, but of these only about 100 are found in the southern half, south of Stafford. Many of these southerners, consistently spelling their names with 'Wo' and having first appeared in Bloxwich (Walsall) in 17th Century, are later concentrated in Walsall. It is possible that this spelling variation reflects the distinctly different vowel pronunciations between the north and south of the county (e.g., southern 'mon' for 'man', 'con' for 'can', 'loff' for 'laff' or laugh).

     The earliest reference to a name which might possibly be related to 'Warrilow' is 'Henry de Warelwich' found in a document of 1176, this is not considered to be particularly strong evidence, but it is never seen again so that it could have changed. In 1253 however, in Inquisition to ascertain the value of land in the Totmonslow Hundred, the name 'de Warilawe' first appears. From this date until 1390 the names of at least twelve different individuals are recorded, and although spelling varies slightly, the fundamental structure and sound of the name are quite clear. At this time all are preceded with 'de' indicating a connection with a specific location.

     From 1390 until the last record seen of 1666, many more individuals are named but without the 'de'. Again spellings vary but all begin with 'War' or 'Wor', all have three syllables, the central one containing the vowel sound provided by 'a, e, i , o, or y', and ending in 'loe, low, law', with or without a final 'e', and in one case 'la'.

Excerpts taken from "The Staffordshire origins of the surname Warrilow with observations on the early history of the family." Written by Bryn Edwards, Walsall, West Midlands, England.

Adobe Acrobat Reader Version of Bryn Edwards' study can be found below. To view and print this document you must have the Adobe Acrobat Reader

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